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Climate-Resilient Agricultural Practices in Different Agro-ecological Zones of Bangladesh

  • Muhammad Abdur Rahaman
  • Mohammad Mahbubur RahmanEmail author
  • Md. Shahadat Hossain
Reference work entry

Abstract

Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change due to its unique geographical position, the dominance of floodplains, low elevation, high population density, high levels of poverty, and overwhelming dependence on nature, its resources, and services. Increasing temperatures, irregular rainfall, drought, and cyclones are adversely affecting agricultural production, in turn creating a high risk to the food security of Bangladesh’s large population. Large-scale climate-resilient practices (structural and nonstructural) are being implemented in different agro-ecological zones (AEZs) of Bangladesh, which have the potential to reduce the vulnerability and risks associated with climate change and contribute to sustainable agricultural development. This chapter explores the spontaneous and planned resilient practices and their possible contribution to food security in different AEZs of Bangladesh. We systematically classify and characterize agrarian adaptation options to climate change. To this end, first, we assess the impacts of climate change on the agriculture sector in Bangladesh. In addition, we analyze the determinants of farmer’s choices between alternative adaptation measures available in different AEZs. Finally, we identify the gaps in the implementation of those practices and the way forward with policy recommendations.

Keywords

Climate change Agriculture Agro-ecological zones Climate resilient Practices Bangladesh 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad Abdur Rahaman
    • 1
  • Mohammad Mahbubur Rahman
    • 2
    Email author
  • Md. Shahadat Hossain
    • 3
  1. 1.Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation, Experiment and Training (CAMET) ParkNoakhaliBangladesh
  2. 2.Network on Climate Change, Bangladesh (NCC,B) TrustDhakaBangladesh
  3. 3.Institute of Water ModelingDhakaBangladesh

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