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Volunteers in Palliative Care

  • Bridget CandyEmail author
  • Joe Low
  • Ros Scott
  • Leena Pelttari
Reference work entry

Abstract

Volunteers are key members of the hospice and palliative care team. In some countries, they are the only source of care provision for a person at a palliative stage of a disease. This chapter highlights both the importance of volunteers in these settings and the impact their contribution makes to care. The chapter covers the definitions of volunteering, the historical development of volunteering in hospice and palliative care, as well as research evaluation to document volunteer practice, an understanding of their distinct role in patient and family care, and assessment of their impact on patients and their families experience. The chapter also provides five case studies from volunteers across the world on their experiences in volunteering.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bridget Candy
    • 1
    Email author
  • Joe Low
    • 1
  • Ros Scott
    • 2
  • Leena Pelttari
    • 3
  1. 1.Marie Curie Palliative Care Research DepartmentUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Dundee University is School of Education and Social WorkDundeeUK
  3. 3.EAPC Task Force on Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care in EuropeHospice AustriaViennaAustria

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