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Allelopathy for Weed Management

  • Naila Farooq
  • Tasawer Abbas
  • Asif Tanveer
  • Khawar JabranEmail author
Living reference work entry
Part of the Reference Series in Phytochemistry book series (RSP)

Abstract

A large number of plant and weed species produce secondary metabolites known as allelochemicals, and the process is known as allelopathy. Allelochemicals can be used to control weeds in agricultural systems by using allelopathic crops for intercropping, crop rotation, or mulching. A few important examples of crop species with high allelopathic potential may include (but not limited to) wheat, rice, sorghum, rye, barley, and sunflower. The naturally produced allelochemicals in these crops could be manipulated to suppress weeds and witness an environment-friendly and sustainable agricultural production system.

Keywords

Allelopathy Weed control Allelopathic crops Crop rotation Intercropping Cover crops 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naila Farooq
    • 1
  • Tasawer Abbas
    • 2
  • Asif Tanveer
    • 3
  • Khawar Jabran
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Soil and Environmental SciencesCollege of Agriculture, University of SargodhaSargodhaPakistan
  2. 2.In-service Agricultural Training InstituteSargodhaPakistan
  3. 3.Department of AgronomyUniversity of AgricultureFaisalabadPakistan
  4. 4.Department of Plant Production and Technologies, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and TechnologiesNiğde Ömer Halisdemir UniversityNiğdeTurkey

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