The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Indigenous Peacebuilding

  • David Andrew OmonaEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_65-1
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Introduction

Conflict, “the pursuit of incompatible goals by different groups” (Miall et al. 2005, p. 22), has been part of humanity from antiquity. Given its destructive nature, every human society has an imbued mechanism to address conflicts using principles and practices central to the support of reconciliation and amnesty.

Indigenous peacebuilding mechanisms are approaches of peacebuilding “inherent in a given society following years of tradition” (Murithi 2006, p. 17) so as to restore order and relationship during or after conflicts (Faure 2000, p. 163). As a mechanism “borne out of a community’s tradition” (Kibwanga 2009, p. 17), it effectively helps “to overcome the contradictions which lie at the root of the conflict” (Galtung 1996, p. 112). Given its cultural context, it is a bottom-up approach where issues of conflicts are addressed holistically at the grassroots with active involvement of local people (Brock-Utne 2001, p. 4; Omona 2015, p. ix). The decision in indigenous...

Keywords

Conflict Indigenous Peacebuilding 
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Further Reading

  1. Francis, D. J. (Ed.). (2008). Conflict and peace in Africa. London/New York: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  2. Kumar, K. (2010). Women and women’s organizations in post-conflict societies: The role of International Assistance Center for Development Information and Evaluation. Washington, DC: USAID.Google Scholar
  3. Lederach, J. P. (2004). Building peace: Sustainable reconciliation in divided societies, Sixth Printing. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace.Google Scholar
  4. Luc, H., & Mark, S. (Eds.) (2008). Traditional justice after a violent conflict: Learning from African experience. Stockholm: IDEA.Google Scholar
  5. Malan, J. (1997). Conflict resolution wisdom from Africa. Durban: ACCORD.Google Scholar
  6. Munoz, E. C. (Ed.) (2003).Women and peace building in Africa: Case studies on traditional conflict resolution practices. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Uganda Christian UniversityMukonoUganda