The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Globalization and Security

  • Manasi SinghEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_56-1

Introduction

Globalization as a phenomenon of intensification of socioeconomic, political, and cultural activities has touched every aspect of human life. There exists a plethora of literature defining and theorizing globalization, and as a multidimensional concept, it is used extensively to describe changes in the contemporary social and political landscape. The rapid pace at which time and space have compressed brings equally sudden shifts in the lives of individuals. Disappearing borders make the states and its populations feel the impact of far distant events. Spread of new diseases, atmospheric pollution, and crashing of markets can be felt like never before, creating a scenario of uncertainty and instability. Moreover, it requires efforts and collaboration at a global level to develop appropriate policy response and protect human well-being.

Globalization has generated novel forms of interconnectedness and interdependence that have thrown several challenges for a Westphalian...

Keywords

Globalization Security Threats State Governance Conflict 
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Ayoob, M. (2005). Security in the age of globalization: Separating appearance from reality. In E. Aydinli & J. N. Rosenau (Eds.), Globalization, security, and the nation state: Paradigms in transition. Albany: State University of New York.Google Scholar
  2. Beck, U. (2009). Critical theory of world risk society: A cosmopolitan vision. Constellations, 16(1), 3–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bigo, D. (2008). Globalized (in)security: The field and the Ban-Opticon. In D. Bigo & A. Tsoukala (Eds.), Terror, insecurity and liberty. Illiberal practices of liberal regimes after 9/11 (pp. 10–48). Abingdon: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cha, V. D. (2000). Globalization and the study of international security. Journal of Peace Research, 37(3), 391–403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Conteh-Morgan, E. (2002). Globalization and human security: A neo-Gramscian perspective. International Journal of Peace Studies, 7(2), 57–73.Google Scholar
  6. Cronin, A. K. (2003). Behind the curve: Globalization and international terrorism. International Security, 27(3), 30–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Duffield, M. (2001). Global governance and the new wars: The merging of development and security. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  8. Giddens, A. (1990). The consequence of modernity. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Kaldor, M. (1999). New and old wars. Organised violence in a global era. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Keohane, R. (2002). The globalization of informal violence, theories of world politics, and the “liberalism of fear”. Dialogue, 1(1), 29–43.Google Scholar
  11. Kinnvall, C. (2004). Globalization and religious nationalism: Self, identity, and the search for ontological security. International Society of Political Psychology, 25(5), 741–767.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Klare, M. T. (2001). Resource wars. The new landscape of global conflict. New York: Henry Holt and Company.Google Scholar
  13. Krahmann, E. (2003). Conceptualizing security governance. Cooperation and Conflict, 38(1), 5–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Mabee, B. (2009). The globalization of security – State power, security provision and legitimacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  15. Naylor, R. T. (1994). Hot money and the politics of international debt. Montreal: Black Rose.Google Scholar
  16. Putzel, J. (2005). Globalization, liberalization, and prospects for the state. International Political Science Review, 26(1), 5–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Reinicke, W. H. (1997). Global public policy. Foreign Affairs, 76(6), 127–138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ripsman, N. M., & Paul, T. V. (2005). Globalization and the national security state: A framework for analysis. International Studies Review, 7(2), 199–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Rosenau, J. (1996). The dynamics of globalization: Toward an operational formulation. Security Dialogue, 27(3), 18–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Wolfers, A. (1962). National security as an ambiguous symbol. In A. Wolfers (Ed.), Discord and collaboration. Essays on international politics (pp. 47–165). Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Aydinli, E., & Rosenau, J. N. (Eds.). (2005). Globalization, security, and the nation state: Paradigms in transition. Albany: State University of New York.Google Scholar
  2. Kirshner, J. (2006). Globalization and national security. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Krahmann, E. (2005). New threats and new actors in international security. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Mabee, B. (2009). The globalization of security – State power, security provision and legitimacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Security StudiesCentral University of GujaratGandhinagarIndia