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Research Regarding Indigenous Student Learning Outcomes in New Zealand, Canada, and the United States of America: Recurring Themes

  • Richard ManningEmail author
  • Joseph Martin
  • Jon Reyhner
  • Larry Steeves
  • Angus Macfarlane
Living reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter examines recurring themes that emerged from research related to the improvement of Indigenous students’ learning outcomes in three countries: New Zealand, Canada, and the United States of America (USA). It begins by describing a New Zealand research project, which outlined key messages for Māori parents and schools emerging from research summarized by Manning et al. (Aust J Indig Stud 40: 92–101, 2011). It then describes two components of similar Canadian research conducted by Steeves (2014) in conjunction with the Seeking their Voices project (Berryman, et al., Seeking their voices: improving indigenous student learning outcomes. Regina. Saskatchewan Instructional Development and Research Unit, University of Regina, Canada, 2014). This included a literature review and 18 interviews. These interviews involved internationally respected academics, as well as key Indigenous/non-Indigenous policy leaders and school system administrators from New Zealand, Canada, and the USA. Finally, it draws upon the selected works to provide a detailed discussion of the recurring themes that emerged from them.

Keywords

Indigenous Education New Zealand Canada America 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Manning
    • 1
    Email author
  • Joseph Martin
    • 3
  • Jon Reyhner
    • 3
  • Larry Steeves
    • 4
  • Angus Macfarlane
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Education, Health & Human DevelopmentUniversity of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand
  2. 2.Māori ResearchUniversity of Canterbury (UC)ChristchurchNew Zealand
  3. 3.Northern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA
  4. 4.University of ReginaReginaCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Aletha M. Harven
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Child DevelopmentCalifornia State University, StanislausTurlockUSA

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