Encyclopedia of Engineering Geology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Peter T. Bobrowsky, Brian Marker

Petrographic Analysis

  • Maria Heloisa Barros de Oliveira FrascáEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73568-9_218

Definition

Petrography is the description and systematic classification of rocks, mainly by the microscopic examination of thin sections.

Introduction

Petrographic analysis identifies the origin, whether igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic, and the mineral content for the classification of a rock.

Analysis usually comprises the description of the macroscopic aspects of the rock, such as fabric, color, grain size, and other relevant characteristics that may be visually observed in hand specimen or in outcrops, and chiefly the identification and description of microscopic characteristics of the studied material in thin sections such as mineral composition, texture, grain size, and evidence of alteration and/or deformation.

The results of petrographic analysis are an important tool for many branches of the geosciences by allowing the determination of the conditions of the formation of the rock, but, in engineering geology, the aim is to explain the mechanical behavior and anticipating...

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MHB Geological ServicesSão PauloBrazil