Encyclopedia of Engineering Geology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Peter T. Bobrowsky, Brian Marker

Mine Closure

  • Jerome V. De GraffEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73568-9_199

Definition

The process for ending the operation of a mine.

Mine closure is the process for ending the operation of a mine. It is commonly embodied in a closure plan developed as part of the operations plan for a particular mine. Robertson and Shaw ( 2006) articulate four key objectives to be considered when closing a mine from operation:
  1. 1.

    Protect public health and safety.

     
  2. 2.

    Alleviate or eliminate environmental damage.

     
  3. 3.

    Achieve a productive use of the land or a return to its original condition or an acceptable alternative.

     
  4. 4.

    To the extent achievable, provide for sustainability of social and economic benefits resulting from mine development and operations.

     

Orderly mine closure depends on planning for providing the details on design and costs to achieve these key objectives (ICMM 2008; Australian Government 2016).

Mine Closure for Active and Abandoned Mines

It may seem counterintuitive to consider closure during the development and opening of a mine. But there are several...

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References

  1. Australian Government (2016) Mine closure completion handbook. Leading practice sustainable development program for the mining industry. Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra, p 121. https://industry.gov.au/resource/Documents/LPSDP/LPSDP-MineClosureCompletionHandbook.pdf. Accessed 29 Aug 2017
  2. BLM (2017) Introduction – extent of the problem. In: Abandoned Mines.gov. U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Washington, DC. http://www.abandonedmines.gov/extent_of_the_problem. Accessed 29 Aug 2017
  3. De Graff JV (2007) Addressing the toxic legacy of abandoned mines on public land in the Western United States. In: De Graff JV (ed) Understanding and responding to hazardous substances at mine sites in the Western United States, Reviews in engineering geology, vol 17. Geological Society of America, Boulder, pp 1–8Google Scholar
  4. De Graff JV, Rogow M, Trainor P (2007) Approaches to contamination at mercury mill sites: examples from California and Idaho. In: De Graff JV (ed) Understanding and responding to hazardous substances at mine sites in the Western United States, Reviews in engineering geology, vol 17. Geological Society of America, Boulder, pp 115–134Google Scholar
  5. ICMM (2008) Planning for integrated mine closure: toolkit. In: International council on mining and metals, London. https://www.icmm.com/website/publications/pdfs/310.pdf. Accessed 29 Aug 2017
  6. Kubit OE, Pluhar CJ, De Graff JV (2014) A model for prioritizing sites and reclamation methods at abandoned mines. Environ Earth Sci 73:7915–7931CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Robertson A, Shaw S (2006) Mine closure. In: Infomine E-Book, 2nd edn. http://www.infomine.com/library/publications/docs/E-Book%2002%20Mine%20Closure.pdf. Accessed 29 Aug 2017

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Science and Mathematics, Department of Earth and Environmental SciencesCalifornia State UniversityFresnoUSA