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Multilayered Ceramic-Composites for Armour Applications

  • Kiran AkellaEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

In this chapter, configurations of ceramic-composite armour for resisting ballistic impact shall be introduced. Mechanics of impact shall be explained. Penetration, perforation, and various energy-absorbing mechanisms shall be enlisted. Relative contributions of multiple parameters to penetration resistance such as material properties and geometric configurations shall be discussed. A range of materials can be used for armour. Effect of the choice of material on aspects such as armour weight and thickness shall be included. Key issues of concern while designing ceramic-composite armour such as relative thicknesses of constituents, shape of ceramic tiles, and their sizes shall be discussed. A few probable approaches for improving energy absorption during impact and post-impact residual strength such as use of layered ceramics, embedding nanofillers, and improving toughness of the composite matrix shall be presented. Aspects of multi-hit resistance in ceramic-composite armour and key challenges encountered by armour designers to achieve multi-hit capability shall be discussed. In closure, shortcomings in currently used ceramic-composite armour design and envisioned future trends for improving its performance shall be highlighted.

Keywords

Ballistic impact Penetration Perforation Materials Design parameters Performance aspects Trends 

List of Abbreviations

AP

Armour piercing

CAI

Compression after impact

CFRP

Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer

CNF

Carbon nanofibers

CP

Complete penetration

DOP

Depth of penetration

FRP

Fiber-reinforced polymer

GFRP

Glass fiber-reinforced polymer

HMPE

High modulus polyethylene

ILSS

Inter-laminar shear strength

L/D

Length-to-diameter

MWCNT

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes

NIJ

National Institute of Justice

PAN

Polyacrylonitrile

PBI

Polybenzimidazole

PBO

Polyphenylenebenzobisozazole

PMC

Polymer matrix composites

RFI

Resin film infusion

RHA

Rolled homogeneous armour

UD

Unidirectional

UHMWPE

Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

VARTM

Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and Development Establishment (Engineers)Defence Research and Development OrganisationPuneIndia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Vemuri Madhu
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Metallurgical Research LaboratoryDefence Research & Development OrganizationKanchanbagh, HyderabadIndia

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