Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall

Restorative Justice: Emergence, Institutionalization, and Critiques

  • Jennifer SpeedEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71066-2_54-1

Synonyms

Definition

Restorative justice encompasses both a set of contemporary practices for, and a philosophical approach to, repairing the harm caused by interpersonal conflict, especially violent crime. It can exist completely apart from, or in concert with, institutionalized criminal justice systems. At a minimum, restorative justice involves the participation of a victim, offender, and facilitator and can also include other stakeholders, such as family members, who have a vested interest in promoting not only the personal well-being of the victim and offender but also the peace and harmony of the community to which they belong. Stakeholders jointly engage issues of harm, responsibility, and desired outcomes, typically in a series of meetings or conferences.

Overview

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Religious Studies University of DaytonDaytonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Golda A Edwin

There are no affiliations available