Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging

Living Edition
| Editors: Danan Gu, Matthew E. Dupre

Supplemental Security Income Program

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69892-2_374-1

Definition

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is a federally administered means-tested program that provides cash assistance and health insurance to low-income aged (65+), blind, and disabled individuals. Most states provide supplemental benefits to the federal benefits.

Overview

The federal SSI program was introduced in 1974 to replace many different state and local programs that provided benefits to low-income aged and disabled individuals (SSA 2019a). State supplements were also introduced to ensure that individuals would not receive lower benefits from the SSI program than they were already receiving from their state or local welfare programs (SSA 2019a, b). The SSI program has been administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) who also administers the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program (also see “Social Security Disability Insurance”, in this volume). The two programs have used identical medical eligibility criteria for disabled adults for...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marxe School of Public and International AffairsBaruch College, City University of New York, CUNY Institute for Demographic ResearchNew YorkUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Na Yin
    • 1
  1. 1.Marxe School of Public and International AffairsBaruch College, City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA