Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging

Living Edition
| Editors: Danan Gu, Matthew E. Dupre

Aging and Popular Music

  • Richard ElliottEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69892-2_259-1

Definition

This entry on aging and popular music refers and popular music refer to three main areas: aging audiences of popular music, aging popular musicians, and the representation of aging within popular music texts. This entry concentrates on Anglophone (primarily North American and British) popular music from the mid-twentieth century onward.

Overview

The first decades of the twenty-first century have produced a growing body of research on aging and the experience of later stages of life, with an emphasis on physical health, lifestyle, and psychology. The discipline of popular music studies (PMS) has also begun to explore the fertile area of age, experience, and memory, with its main focus being on how people use popular music at later stages in their lives. While research on audiences has dominated, work has also emerged that analyzes the role of aging musicians and the representation of time, age, and experience in popular music. These three broad areas can be mapped onto...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Newcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sarah Falcus
    • 1
  1. 1.University of HuddersfieldHuddersfieldUK