Encyclopedia of Security and Emergency Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Lauren R. Shapiro, Marie-Helen Maras

Cybersecurity: Policy

  • Alex ChungEmail author
  • Sneha Dawda
  • Atif Hussain
  • Siraj Ahmed Shaikh
  • Madeline Carr
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69891-5_20-1

Definition

Cybersecurity policy refers to a course of action adopted by a state, an organization, or a set of actors with the aim of ensuring cybersecurity and/or digital competitiveness as well as defining the individual and collective responsibilities in pursuit of that goal.

Introduction: What Is Cybersecurity Policy and Why Does It Matter?

Cybersecurity policy refers to a course of action adopted by a state, an organization, or a set of actors with the aim of ensuring cybersecurity and/or digital competitiveness as well as defining the individual and collective responsibilities in pursuit of that goal. Broadly conceived, this area of public policy concerns complex, multifaceted, and dynamic security and business innovation related to information and communications technology (ICT). Cybersecurity policymaking includes legal, regulatory, technical, organizational, behavioral, international, and other capacity-building areas. Policy dimensions attached to these include information...

Keywords

Adaptive policymaking (APM) Agile governance Attribution Budapest Convention Critical infrastructure Cyber Cyberattack Cybercrime Cybersecurity European Union (EU) Evidence-based policymaking Geopolitics Incident response International relations Mutual legal assistance treaty (MLAT) UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) National cyber security strategy (NCSS) US National Cyber Strategy (NCS) US National Security Strategy (NSS) Polycentric governance Public policy Public-private partnership Socio-technical Tallinn Manual United Kingdom (UK) United Nations (UN) United States (USA) Wicked problem 
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References

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Further Reading

  1. Her Majesty’s Government. (2016). National Cyber security strategy 2016–2021 (cited as NCSS).Google Scholar
  2. NCS. (2018). National Cyber strategy of the United States of America ‘National Cyber Strategy of the United States of America.’ The White House, Washington, DC, September.Google Scholar
  3. NSS. (2017). National Security strategy of the United States of America. The White House, Washington, DC, December.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Chung
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sneha Dawda
    • 1
  • Atif Hussain
    • 2
  • Siraj Ahmed Shaikh
    • 2
  • Madeline Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (UCL STEaPP)University College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Systems Security GroupInstitute for Future Transport and Cities (FTC), Coventry UniversityCoventryUK