Encyclopedia of Security and Emergency Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Lauren R. Shapiro, Marie-Helen Maras

Homeland Security Act of 2002

  • James M. Duggan
  • James J. F. ForestEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69891-5_128-1

Definition

An Act passed by the Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush creating the Department of Homeland Security and reorganizing several other government agencies.

Introduction

The attacks of September 11, 2001, created considerable fear among the US population and pressure for the government to punish those responsible for the attacks, as well as to better secure the homeland. The USA responded with a “war on terrorism” and the largest reorganization of the US government apparatus since the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Department of Defense (DoD) were created in the wake of World War II (Crenshaw and Lafree 2017). President George W. Bush and his staff moved quickly to address the identified weaknesses and vulnerabilities within our counterterrorism structure, while some within the government made pleas for a more judicious approach to such an extensive reorganization (Chang 2014; Crenshaw and Lafree 2017). Nonetheless, the Homeland Security Act of 2002...

Keywords

Department of Homeland Security US Congressional Legislation Federal Government Terrorism Counterterrorism 
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References

  1. Brattberg, E. (2014). Coordinating for contingencies: Taking stock of post-9/11 homeland security reforms. In J. J. F. Forest, R. D. Howard, & J. C. Moore (Eds.), Homeland security and terrorism: Readings and interpretations (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  2. Bush, G. W. (2002). The department of homeland security. Washington, DC: White House.Google Scholar
  3. Chang, N. (2014). The USA Patriot Act: What’s so patriotic about trampling on the bill of rights? In J. J. F. Forest, R. D. Howard, & J. C. Moore (Eds.), Homeland security and terrorism: Readings and interpretations (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  4. Crenshaw, M., & Lafree, G. (2017). Countering terrorism. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.Google Scholar
  5. Congress (2002). Pub. Law 107-296. The Homeland Security Act of 2002. Washington, DC: Congress.Google Scholar
  6. Congress (2017). H.R. 2825. Department of Homeland Security Authorization Act of 2017. Washington DC: Congress.Google Scholar
  7. Rittgers, D. (2014). Abolish the department of homeland security. In J. J. F. Forest, R. D. Howard, & J. C. Moore (Eds.), Homeland security and terrorism: Readings and interpretations (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  8. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security. National Strategy for Homeland Security, October 2007. Online at: https://www.dhs.gov/national-strategy-homeland-security-october-2007.

Further Reading

  1. Bush, G. W. (2002). The department of homeland security. Washington, DC: White House.Google Scholar
  2. Forest, J. (2018). The terrorism lectures (3rd ed.). Santa Ana: Nortia Press.Google Scholar
  3. Congress. (2017). H.R. 2025. Department of Homeland Security Authorization Act of 2017. Washington, DC: Congress.Google Scholar
  4. Public Law 107-296. (2002). The Homeland Security Act of 2002. Washington, DC: Congress.Google Scholar
  5. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, History Office. Brief Documentary History of the Department of Homeland Security, 2001–2008. Online at: https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=37027

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Terrorism and Security StudiesUniversity of Massachusetts LowellLowellUSA