Encyclopedia of Security and Emergency Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Lauren R. Shapiro, Marie-Helen Maras

Critical Infrastructure: Government Facilities Sector, (GFS)

  • Ronald MartinEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69891-5_126-1

Definitions

Security for the Government Facilities Sector (GFS) involves protection of business, judicial, educational, and cultural activities in governmental facilities (GFS SSP 2015).

Introduction

The GFS encompasses federal government facilities that are owned, leased, and operated by the U S government nationally and internationally. Specifically, two US federal organizations – Federal Protective Service (FPS) of the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the General Services Administration (GSA) – oversee its operation (GFS SSP 2015, p. 10). The GFS has two major sub-sectors, including educational facilities (EF) and the national monuments and icons (NMI) (GFS SSP 2015, p. 10). The Department of Education (ED) released the Education Facilities Subsector Snapshot (EDSS) outlining this subsector in 2011, based on Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 (HSPD-7). At that time, there were of 18 critical infrastructure sectors (HSPD-7 2003a). A full description of the 18...

Keywords

GFS NRF NIPP SSP NMI GSA FISMA FPS PBS WBDG ISC NRF FEMA CIRC DoD CIP PPD HSPD REMS IHE Clery HEA SSA UFC 
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Future Reading

  1. Federal Emergency Management Agency. (2008). Emergency support functions annexes: Introduction. Washington, DC: US Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved from https://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/nrf-esf-intro.pdf.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Capitol Technology UniversityLaurelUSA