Good Health and Well-Being

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Tony Wall, Ulisses Azeiteiro, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar

Palliative Care

  • Bruce TsaiEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69627-0_95-1

Definition

The World Health Organization (WHO) currently defines palliative care as “an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.

Palliative care:
  • Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms;

  • Affirms life and regards dying as a normal process;

  • Intends neither to hasten [n]or postpone death;

  • Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care;

  • Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death;

  • Offers a support system to help the family cope during the patients illness and in their own bereavement;

  • Uses a team approach to address the needs of patients and their families, including bereavement counselling, if indicated;

  • Will enhance quality of life, and...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

Section editors and affiliations

  • Giorgi Pkhakadze
    • 1
  • Monica de Andrade
  1. 1.School of Public HealthDAVID TVILDIANI MEDICAL UNIVERSITYTbilisiGeorgia