Good Health and Well-Being

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Tony Wall, Ulisses Azeiteiro, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar

Flourishing and Eudaimonic Well-Being

  • Vinathe Sharma-Brymer
  • Eric Brymer
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69627-0_4-1

The authors in this entry discuss flourishing and eudaimonic well-being in the context of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of good health and well-being which are set to be achieved by 2030. Firstly, an outline of the SDGs is presented, followed by a brief overview of contemporary perspectives on well-being. Thereafter, in order to clarify the notion of eudaimonic well-being, some of the debates on the definitions of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being are explored. Well-being is revealed to be an evolving multidimensional concept that is accepting of multiple perspectives. The authors then discuss traditional and emerging literature that explores the applicability of eudaimonic well-being and flourishing as it pertains to sustaining the holistic health of global human populations. The significance of contemporary scholarly engagement with flourishing and eudaimonic well-being, with multilayered, interdisciplinary approaches, is recognized as imperative for...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sharma-Brymer Consultancy ServicesBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Institute of Sport, Physical Activity and LeisureLeeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Giorgi Pkhakadze
    • 1
  • Monica de Andrade
  1. 1.School of Public HealthDAVID TVILDIANI MEDICAL UNIVERSITYTbilisiGeorgia