Good Health and Well-Being

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Tony Wall, Ulisses Azeiteiro, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar

Creative Writing for Health and Well-Being

  • Tony WallEmail author
  • Victoria Field
  • Jūratė Sučylaitė
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69627-0_13-1

Synonyms

Definition

Creative writing for health and well-being is a constellation of individual or group-based practices which engage with words and writing for the purposes of creating health and well-being outcomes. This can include the listening to, orating, and reflecting on a wide variety of literature including stories and poems.

Introduction

Creative writing for health and well-being has emerged from a constellation of arts-based practices which have been explicitly linked to health and well-being, that is, a set of practices which are recognized as having a role in “resolving the social and cultural challenges facing today’s world” (UNESCO 2010, p. 8). With a burgeoning empirical base of evidence of the role and impacts of arts-based practices for health and well-being, there is an increasing acknowledgment that such practices can help “keep us...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Wall
    • 1
    Email author
  • Victoria Field
    • 2
  • Jūratė Sučylaitė
    • 3
  1. 1.International Thriving at Work Research CentreUniversity of ChesterChesterUK
  2. 2.The Poetry Practice Ltd and England Centre for Practice DevelopmentCanterbury Christ Church UniversityCanterburyUK
  3. 3.Klaipėda UniversityKlaipėdaLithuania

Section editors and affiliations

  • Tony Wall
    • 1
  1. 1.International Centre for Thriving at WorkUniversity of ChesterChesterUK