Zero Hunger

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall

Sustainable Agro-Food Production

  • Hamid El BilaliEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69626-3_52-1

Synonyms

Definition

Sustainable agricultural development: Sustainable agricultural development is agricultural development that contributes to improving resource efficiency, strengthening resilience and securing social equity/responsibility of agriculture and food systems in order to ensure food security and nutrition for all, now and in the future (HLPE 2016: 29).

Introduction: Sustainable Agro-Food Production in SDG 2 “Zero Hunger”

One of the components of the sustainable development goal (SDG) 2 in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is to promote sustainable agriculture (Table 1). Other components of SDG2 ( end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture) deal with zero hunger/food security and nutrition. There are strong linkages among the three components; sustainable agriculture is crucial to achieve food security and improved nutrition. The 2030 Agenda further explains what is meant by sustainable and...
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Alexandratos N, Bruinsma J (2012) World agriculture towards 2030/2050: the 2012 revision. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  2. Altieri MA (1980) Agroecology: the science of sustainable agriculture. Westview Press, BoulderGoogle Scholar
  3. Altieri MA (2002) Agroecology: the science of natural resource management for poor farmers in marginal environments. Agric Ecosyst Environ 93:1–24CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Altieri MA (2009) Agroecology, small farms, and food sovereignty. Mon Rev 61:102.  https://doi.org/10.14452/MR-061-03-2009-07_8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boller EF, Avilla J, Joerg E et al (2004) Integrated production: principles and technical guidelines. Bull OILB/SROP 27:1–12Google Scholar
  6. Bruinsma J (2011) The resources outlook: by how much do land, water and crop yields need to increase by 2050. In: Conforti P (ed) Looking ahead in world food and agriculture: perspectives to 2050. FAO, Rome, pp 233–278Google Scholar
  7. Carney D (1998) Sustainable rural livelihoods: what contribution can we make? Department for International Development, LondonGoogle Scholar
  8. CIRAD (2016) A literature review about experiences, research and innovation results obtained with a large spectrum of intensification pathways. Deliverable D2.1 of PROIntensAfrica project. http://www.intensafrica.org/documents/#
  9. Dalgaard T, Hutchings NJ, Porter JR (2003) Agroecology, scaling and interdisciplinarity. Agric Ecosyst Environ 100:39–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Demeter Association (2017) Biodynamic farm standard. Demeter Association Inc., CorvallisGoogle Scholar
  11. Dobermann A, Nelson R (2013) Opportunities and solutions for sustainable food production. Background paper for the high-level Panel of eminent persons on the Post-2015 development agenda. http://unsdsn.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/130112-HLP-TG7-Solutions-for-sustainable-food-production.pdf
  12. Elzen B, Augustyn AM, Barbier M, Van Mierlo B (2017) AgroEcological transitions changes and breakthroughs in the making. Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen.  https://doi.org/10.18174/407609CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. EurActiv (2015) Europe entering the era of “precision agriculture”. https://www.euractiv.com/section/science-policymaking/news/europe-entering-the-era-of-precision-agriculture. Accessed 30 May 2018
  14. European Commission (2016) Sustainable food. Available at: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/eussd/food.htm. Accessed 19 Nov 2018
  15. FAO (1988) Report of the FAO Council, 94th Session, 1988. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  16. FAO (2001) Mixed crop-livestock farming: a review of traditional technologies based on literature and field experience. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  17. FAO (2011) Save and grow. A policymaker’s guide to sustainable intensification of smallholder crop production. www.fao.org/docrep/014/i2215e/i2215e.pdf
  18. FAO (2013a) FAO statistical yearbook 2013. World food and agriculture. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  19. FAO (2013b) Sustainability assessment of food and agricultural system: indicators. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  20. FAO (2013c) Climate-smart agriculture: sourcebook. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  21. FAO (2014a) Building a common vision for sustainable food and agriculture – principles and approaches. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  22. FAO (2014b) Developing sustainable food value chains – guiding principles. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  23. FAO (2014c) The state of food and agriculture: innovation in family farming. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  24. FAO (2015a) Agroforestry – definition. http://www.fao.org/forestry/agroforestry/80338/en. Accessed 30 May 2018
  25. FAO (2015b) Agroecology for food security and nutrition. In: Proceedings of the FAO international symposium, 18–19 September 2014, Rome. www.fao.org/3/a-i4729e.pdf
  26. FAO (2018a) Conservation agriculture. http://www.fao.org/ag/ca/1a.html. Accessed 30 May 2018
  27. FAO (2018b) Climate-smart agriculture. http://www.fao.org/climate-smart-agriculture/overview/en/. Accessed 30 May 2018
  28. FAO (2018c) Agroecology & family farming. http://www.fao.org/family-farming/themes/agroecology/en. Accessed 30 May 2018
  29. Foley JA, Ramankutty N, Brauman KA et al (2011) Solutions for a cultivated planet. Nature 478:337.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10452CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Food Ethics Council (2012) Sustainable intensification: unravelling the rhetoric. Food Ethics 7:1–30Google Scholar
  31. Foresight (2011) The future of food and farming. Final project report, The Government Office for Science, LondonGoogle Scholar
  32. Francis C, Lieblein G, Gliessman S et al (2003) Agroecology: the ecology of food systems. J Sustain Agric 22:99–118.  https://doi.org/10.1300/J064v22n03_10CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Freibauer A, Mathijs E, Brunori G et al (2011) Sustainable food consumption and production in a resource-constrained world. European Commission – Standing Committee on Agricultural Research (SCAR), Brussels.  https://doi.org/10.2777/49719CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Fukuoka M (1985) The natural way of farming: the theory and practice of green philosophy. Japan Publications, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  35. Garnett T (2014) Three perspectives on sustainable food security: efficiency, demand restraint, food system transformation. What role for life cycle assessment? J Clean Prod 73:10.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2013.07.045CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Garnett T, Appleby MC, Balmford A et al (2013) Sustainable intensification in agriculture: premises and policies. Science 341:33–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Gladek E, Fraser M, Roemers G et al (2016) The global food system: an analysis. Metabolic, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  38. Gliessman SR (1998) Agroecology: ecological processes in sustainable agriculture. Ann Arbor Press, ChelseaGoogle Scholar
  39. Gliessman SR (2006) Agroecology: the ecology of sustainable food systems. CRC Press, Boca RatonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Gliessman S (2015) Agroecology: a growing field. Agroecol Sustain Food Syst 39:1–2.  https://doi.org/10.1080/21683565.2014.965869CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Gliessman S (2016) Transforming food systems with agroecology. Agroecol Sustain Food Syst 40:187–189CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Gliessman SR, Engles EW (2015) Agroecology: the ecology of sustainable food systems. CRC Press, Boca RatonGoogle Scholar
  43. Godfray HCJ, Beddington JR, Crute IR et al (2010) Food security: the challenge of feeding 9 billion people. Science 327:812–818.  https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1185383CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Gregory PJ, Ingram JSI (2000) Global change and food and forest production: future scientific challenges. Agric Ecosyst Environ 82:3.  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0167-8809(00)00212-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Gregory PJ, Ingram JSI, Andersson R et al (2002) Environmental consequences of alternative practices for intensifying crop production. Agric Ecosyst Environ 88:279.  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0167-8809(01)00263-8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Harper JL (1974) Agricultural ecosystem. Agro-Ecosystems 1:1–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. HLPE (2016) Sustainable agricultural development for food security and nutrition: what roles for livestock? HLPE, RomeGoogle Scholar
  48. Holt-Giménez E, Altieri MA (2013) Agroecology, food sovereignty, and the new green revolution. Agroecol Sustain Food Syst.  https://doi.org/10.1080/10440046.2012.716388
  49. IFOAM (2018a) Definition of organic agriculture. https://www.ifoam.bio/en/organic-landmarks/definition-organic-agriculture. Accessed 29 May 2018
  50. IFOAM (2018b) Community supported agriculture (CSA). https://www.ifoam.bio/en/community-supported-agriculture-csa. Accessed 30 May 2018
  51. IPES-Food (2015) The new science of sustainable food systems: overcoming barriers to food systems reform. International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food). www.ipes-food.org/images/Reports/IPES_report01_1505_web_br_pages.pdf
  52. IPES-Food (2016) From uniformity to diversity: a paradigm shift from industrial agriculture to diversified agroecological systems. www.ipes-food.org/images/Reports/UniformityToDiversity_FullReport.pdf
  53. Latruffe L, Diazabakana A, Bockstaller C et al (2016) Measurement of sustainability in agriculture: a review of indicators. Stud Agric Econ 118:123.  https://doi.org/10.7896/j.1624CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Mokicho Okada Association (MOA) (1995) The fundamentals of MOA nature farming. In: Nature farming and its practice. Mokicho Okada Association International, Shizuoka-kenGoogle Scholar
  55. Mollison B (1997) Introduction to permaculture. Tagari Publications, TasmaniaGoogle Scholar
  56. Niggli U, Slabe A, Schmid O et al (2008) Vision for an organic food and farming research agenda to 2025. IFOAM-EU Group, BrusselsGoogle Scholar
  57. Parr JF, Papendick RI, Youngberg IG, Meyer RE (1990) Sustainable agriculture in the United States. In: Edwards CA, Lal R, Madden P et al (eds) Sustainable agricultural systems. Soil and Water Conservation Society, Ankeny, pp 50–67Google Scholar
  58. Pesek J (1983) Introduction. In: Dahlgren RB (ed) Proceedings of the management alternatives for biological farming workshop. Iowa State University, AmesGoogle Scholar
  59. Pretty J, Toulmin C, Williams S (2011) Sustainable intensification in African agriculture. Int J Agric Sustain 9:5.  https://doi.org/10.3763/ijas.2010.0583CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. PROIntensAfrica (2017) Pathways to sustainable intensification of the agri-food system in Africa. http://www.intensafrica.org/documents
  61. Reytar K, Hanson C, Henninger N (2014) Indicators of sustainable agriculture: a scoping analysis. World Resources Institute (WRI), Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  62. Rockström J, Steffen W, Noone K et al (2009) Planetary boundaries: exploring the safe operating space for humanity. Ecol Soc.  https://doi.org/10.5751/ES-03180-140232
  63. Rockström J, Williams J, Daily G et al (2017) Sustainable intensification of agriculture for human prosperity and global sustainability. Ambio 46:4.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-016-0793-6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Rosset P, Martinez-Torres ME (2013) La via Campesina and agroecology. La via Campesina’s open book: celebrating 20 years of struggle and Hope. https://viacampesina.org/downloads/pdf/openbooks/EN-12.pdf
  65. RUAF (2018) Urban agriculture: what and why? http://www.ruaf.org/urban-agriculture-what-and-why. Accessed 28 May 2018
  66. Searchinger T, Hanson C, Ranganathan J, Lipinski B, Waite R, Winterbottom R, Dinshaw A, Heimlich R (2013) The great balancing act. Installment 1 of “Creating a sustainable food future”. World Resources Institute, Washington, DC. https://www.wri.org/publication/great-balancing-act. Accessed 25 May 2018Google Scholar
  67. Steffen W, Richardson K, Rockstrom J et al (2015) Planetary boundaries: guiding human development on a changing planet. Science 347:1259855.  https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1259855CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Terra Genesis International (2017) Regenerative agriculture: a definition. http://www.terra-genesis.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Regenerative-Agriculture-Definition.pdf
  69. The Montpellier Panel (2013) Sustainable intensification: a new paradigm for African agriculture. http://ag4impact.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/MP_0176_Report_Redesign_2016.pdf
  70. Tilman D, Cassman KG, Matson PA et al (2002) Agricultural sustainability and intensive production practices. Nature 418:671–677.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01014CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Tittonell P (2014) Ecological intensification of agriculture-sustainable by nature. Curr Opin Environ Sustain 8:53–61.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2014.08.006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Tittonell P (2015) Food security and ecosystem services in a changing world. In: Proceedings of the FAO international symposium “agroecology for food security and nutrition”, 18–19 September 2014, Rome. http://www.fao.org/3/ai4327e.pdf
  73. Townsend R (2015) Ending poverty and hunger by 2030: an agenda for the global food system. World Bank, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  74. United Nations (2015) Transforming our world: the 2030 agenda for sustainable development. United Nations, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  75. World Bank (2007) World development report 2008: agriculture for development. World Bank, Washington, DCCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. World Bank (2016) Poverty and shared prosperity 2016: taking on inequality. The World Bank, Washington, DCCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Development ResearchUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU)ViennaAustria

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mohammad Sadegh Allahyari
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Agricultural ManagementRasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, RashtRashtIran