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Configurations of High Corporate Environmental Responsibility with Regard to Business Legitimacy: A Cross-National Approach

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Abstract

This chapter identifies configurations of CR programs associated with high environmental responsibility. The approach elaborates how institutional fields, particularly regulative and stakeholder pressures, and firms’ CR orientations (employee, community, and consumer CR) influence firms to adopt high environmental CR. We present a sample of 573 firms in four European Union (EU) countries: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, and Latvia. The chapter identifies CR program configurations associated with high environmental performance and how this can vary across societal contexts. This chapter contributes to the existing literatures on corporate responsibility and business legitimacy as well as provides insights on environmental strategies adopted by firms.

Keywords

  • Ambidexterity
  • Corporate responsibility
  • Configurations
  • Environmental responsibility
  • Institutional approach legitimacy
  • Stakeholder pressure

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Correspondence to Marjo Siltaoja .

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Siltaoja, M., Egri, C.P., Furrer, O., Haapanen, M., Alas, R., Sinding, K. (2020). Configurations of High Corporate Environmental Responsibility with Regard to Business Legitimacy: A Cross-National Approach. In: Rendtorff, J. (eds) Handbook of Business Legitimacy. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68845-9_85-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68845-9_85-1

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