Encyclopedia of Signaling Molecules

2018 Edition
| Editors: Sangdun Choi

MOB1A

  • Bruno Carmona
  • Alexandra Tavares
  • Sofia Nolasco
  • Alexandre Leitão
  • Helena Soares
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67199-4_101509

Synonyms

Historical Background

The accuracy of cell division is fundamental for the maintenance of cell ploidy and genomic stability. During cell division, many events, like DNA replication, chromosome segregation, mitosis completion, and cytokinesis, must be tightly controlled. The deregulation of these events is closely associated with severe pathology. Among other factors, the accuracy of cell division relies on the correct placement of the division plane which is dependent on the polarity axis (Lu and Johnston 2013).

Both in unicellular organisms and in metazoan, the cell spindle position is regulated to be perpendicular or planar to the division plane, allowing this way to equally segregate the chromosomes between the two daughter cells. In either case, the correct position/orientation of the spindle is required to maintain cell architecture and tissues homeostasis, events that are on the origin...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruno Carmona
    • 1
    • 3
  • Alexandra Tavares
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Sofia Nolasco
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Alexandre Leitão
    • 4
  • Helena Soares
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de CiênciasUniversidade de LisboaLisboaPortugal
  2. 2.Instituto Gulbenkian de CiênciaOeirasPortugal
  3. 3.Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde de LisboaLisboaPortugal
  4. 4.Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal, Faculdade de Medicina VeterináriaUniversidade de LisboaLisboaPortugal