Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho

Risk Assessment and Sustainable Development

  • Daniela Godoy Falco
  • Carla Kazue Nakao Cavaliero
  • Sonia Regina da Cal SeixasEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63951-2_184-1

Definition

Risk is the uncertain about an event, with the knowledge of the odds. So, risk assessment involves hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and characterization. However, many risks cannot be quantified, because they consider values, behaviors, social influences, and cultural identity. Therefore, in order to assess risks for sustainable development in higher education, an interdisciplinary, and a multidimensional perspective are necessary.

Introduction

Teaching and researching used to be core functions in universities since such institutions became independent of church and state. Recently, however, a third mission was granted to universities: to serve the interests of society (Szabo 2009). Nowadays, society is facing a global crisis, forcing it to choose and implement a sustainable way to develop itself. The need for choosing starts to grow due to demographic changes, industrial and technological progress and increasing energy consumption, and...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniela Godoy Falco
    • 1
  • Carla Kazue Nakao Cavaliero
    • 1
  • Sonia Regina da Cal Seixas
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Energy, Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Campinas – UNICAMPCampinasBrazil
  2. 2.Environmental Studies and Research Centre (NEPAM) University of Campinas – UNICAMPCampinasBrazil

Section editors and affiliations

  • Evangelos Manolas
    • 1
  1. 1.Democritus University of ThraceThraceGreece