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Assessment of Young English Learners in Instructional Settings

  • Yuko Goto ButlerEmail author
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

With the growing number of children worldwide learning English in instructional settings, educators are increasingly concerned with how best to assess their language development. However, assessing young learners (YLs, defined in this chapter as children age 5–12) warrants a number of special considerations due to their age and other unique characteristics. After discussing young language learners’ unique characteristics and needs with respect to assessment, this chapter addresses the following major issues that arise when assessing them: (a) targeted language abilities for YLs, (b) age-appropriate formats and procedures of assessment, (c) assessment for learning (e.g., feedback and diagnostic information in assessment and assessment for autonomy enhancement), and (d) challenges to meet YLs’ diverse needs (e.g., students with multilingual backgrounds and students with disabilities). The chapter concludes with suggestions for future research directions, including (a) more child second language acquisition research to inform assessment theory and practice, (b) addressing teachers’ role in assessment to better assist YLs’ learning, and (c) greater attention to the use of technology for YLs’ assessment.

Keywords

Young learners Age Assessment for learning Feedback Autonomy Technology Accountability Standards 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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