Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Transcortical Motor Aphasia

  • Lyn S. TurkstraEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_932

Synonyms

Adynamia

Short Description

Transcortical motor aphasia is a subtype of nonfluent aphasia in which repetition is preserved relative to impaired verbal output. Expressive language is effortful and halting, with disrupted prosody, paraphasic errors, and perseveration. Confrontation naming may be intact. Comprehension is better than production, with impairments primarily on complex language tasks.

Categorization

Transcortical motor aphasia is a subtype of nonfluent aphasia, differentiated from other nonfluent aphasia types by the patient’s ability to repeat words and phrases in the absence of fluent extemporaneous speech.

Natural History, Prognostic Factors, and Outcomes

Transcortical aphasias are relatively rare, occurring in less than 10% of patients with stroke (Bakheit et al. 2007; Laska et al. 2001). When a patient presents with transcortical aphasia after a stroke, recovery is typically rapid. For nonvascular disorders, the prognosis for recovery depends on the etiology as...

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References and Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Rehabilitation ScienceMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada