Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Pragmatic Communication

  • Angela Hein CicciaEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_914

Synonyms

Language use; Pragmatic communication; Pragmatics; Social language

Definition

Social communication is the integration of sociolinguistic rules during a communication interaction that occurs within a specified context in real-time; that is, social communication is the way language is used in a context-dependent manner to communicate rather than the way language is structured. Social communication is thought of as an organizational framework for other aspects of language including semantics and syntax (Lahey 1988) and encompasses linguistic information (e.g., word choice), supralinguistic information (nonverbal behavior such as facial expression, body language, and intonation), and contextual information (Owens 1992). Social communication, in contrast to other aspects of language, emphasizes the communication of meaning and the variety of functions that language serves, including literal and nonliteral communicative events (Murray and Chapey 2001; Murray and Clark 2015).

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological Sciences, Program in Communication SciencesCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA