Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Global Aphasia

  • Lyn S. TurkstraEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_889

Short Description

Global aphasia is an aphasia type in which there are no functional verbal comprehension or expression and no use of gestures to represent language.

Categorization

Global aphasia is a subtype of nonfluent aphasia.

Natural History, Prognostic Factors, and Outcomes

Incidence studies suggest that global aphasia may be one of the most common aphasia types (Peach 2001). Most individuals with global aphasia present with a combination of aphasia, apraxia of speech, and hemiparesis contralateral to the side of lesion, consistent with large lesions of the language-dominant hemisphere. There are cases, however, in which there is no motor involvement and primary motor areas are spared (Bang et al. 2004; Hanlon et al. 1999).

In general, the prognosis for recovery of premorbid language skills is poor in individuals with global aphasia. This is not to say, however, that individuals with global aphasia do not show meaningful improvement over time. In consecutive studies of patients...

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References and Readings

  1. Bakheit, A. M. O., Shaw, S., Carrington, S., & Griffiths, S. (2007). The rate and extent of improvement with therapy from the different types of aphasia in the first year after stroke. Clinical Rehabilitation, 21, 941–949.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bang, O. Y., Heo, K. G., Kwak, Y., Lee, P. H., Joo, I. S., & Huh, K. J. (2004). Global aphasia without hemiparesis: Lesion analysis and its mechanism in 11 Korean patients. Neurological Sciences, 217, 101–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chapey, R. (2001). Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.Google Scholar
  4. Goodglass, H. (1993). Understanding aphasia. San Diego: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  5. Hanlon, R. E., Lux, W. E., & Dromerick, A. W. (1999). Global aphasia without hemiparesis: Language profiles and lesion distribution. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 66(3), 365–369.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Helm-Estabrooks, N., Ramsberger, G., & Morgan, A. (1989). Boston assessment of severe aphasia. Chicago, IL: The Riverside Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  7. Laska, A. C., Hellblom, A., Murray, V., Kahan, T., & Von Arbin, M. (2001). Aphasia in acute stroke and relation to outcome. Journal of Internal Medicine, 249, 413–422.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Peach, R. K. (2001). Clinical intervention for global aphasia. In R. Chapey (Ed.), Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Rehabilitation ScienceMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada