Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Halstead, Ward (1908–1968)

  • Anthony Y. StringerEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_623

Landmark Clinical, Scientific, and Professional Contributions

  • Ward Halstead opened a laboratory at the University of Chicago in 1935 for the psychological study of neurological and neurosurgical patients. As a physiological psychologist trained in brain ablation techniques, Halstead brought the meticulous methodology of the animal laboratory to his clinical lab. During the 1930s and 1940s, Halstead worked in conjunction with neurologists and neurosurgeons at the University of Chicago to evaluate patients from a neuropsychological perspective. He devised and tested great many tasks with patients, discarding more than he kept until settling upon a set of tests that eventually formed the nucleus of the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery (HRNTB). Many of the tests he used with clinical subjects were drawn directly from the animal laboratory. For example, the Category Test, a mainstay of the HRNTB, was inspired by Heinrick Klüver’s work on stimulus generalization in monkeys...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References and Readings

  1. Halstead, W. C. (1947). Brain and intelligence: A quantitative study of the frontal lobes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. Hartman, D. E. (1991). Reply to Reitan: Unexamined premises and the evolution of clinical neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 6, 147–165.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hebb, D. O. (1983). Neuropsychology: Retrospect and prospect. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 37, 4–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Reed, J. (1985). The contributions of Ward Halstead, Ralph reitan and their associates. International Journal of Neuroscience, 25, 289–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Reitan, R. M. (2002). The best-laid plans – And the vagaries of circumstantial events. In A. Y. Stringer, E. L. Cooley, & A.-L. Christensen (Eds.), Pathways to prominence in neuropsychology: Reflections of twentieth-century pioneers. New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  6. Stringer, A. Y., & Cooley, E. L. (2002). Neuropsychology: A twentieth-century science. In A. Y. Stringer, E. L. Cooley, & A.-L. Christensen (Eds.), Pathways to prominence in neuropsychology: Reflections of twentieth-century pioneers. New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  7. Wechsler, D. A. (1958). The measurement and appraisal of adult intelligence. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA