Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP)

  • Christine Maguth NezuEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_590

Membership

The American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) has over 3100 currently active board-certified specialists in membership. As a national-in-scope credentialing organization in professional psychology, its membership is comprised doctoral-level psychologists who provide professional services and consultation and are licensed to practice psychology in the jurisdiction in which they practice. Completion of a doctoral degree, completion of a qualified internship, relevant postdoctoral experience, and relevant jurisdictional licensure as a psychologist are the minimum prerequisites for approval to take an ABPP board certification exam. However, through its Early Entry Option, ABPP permits psychology graduate students, interns, and residents to begin the application process at a reduced fee, submitting credentials as they are completed until full eligibility criteria are met for the selected specialty area.

Major Areas or Mission Statement

The American Board of Professional...

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References and Readings

  1. American Board of Professional Psychology. (2008). Retrieved June 25, 2008, from http://www.abpp.org
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDrexel University–Hahnemann CampusPhiladelphiaUSA