Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Epstein-Barr Virus

  • Susan K. JohnsonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_552

Definition

Epstein-Barr virus, frequently referred to as EBV, is a member of the herpesvirus family and one of the most common human viruses. The virus occurs worldwide, and most people become infected with EBV sometime during their lives. In the United States, approximately 95% of adults have been infected.

Infection with EBV often results in mononucleosis. Symptoms of infectious mononucleosis are fever, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Although the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis usually resolve quickly, EBV remains dormant or latent in blood cells for lifetime.

Evaluation and Treatment

The clinical diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis is based on symptoms of fever, sore throat, swollen lymph glands, and the age of the patient. Usually, laboratory tests are needed for confirmation. Serologic results for persons with infectious mononucleosis include an elevated white blood cell count, an increased percentage of certain atypical white blood cells, and a positive reaction to...

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References and Readings

  1. National Center for Infectious Diseases Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Webpage at www.cdc.gov/epstein-barr/index.html. Updated Jan 7, 2014.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA