Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke

  • Tamara BushnikEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1956

Synonyms

PASS

Definition

The Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS) was developed to assess postural control in stroke patients within the first 3 months after stroke. Many postural assessments are not specifically designed for stroke and have not been adequately analyzed for psychometric properties. The PASS is adapted from the BL Motor Assessment, which is a revision of the Fugl-Meyer scale in which each item has a minimum of four response levels to improve sensitivity (Benaim et al. 1999). The PASS contains 12 items representing a wide range of performance difficulty; each item is rated on a four-point response scale. The items can be grouped into two main categories: maintaining a posture and changing posture. Sample items from each category, respectively, include standing with support (response categories from “cannot stand even with support – 0” to “can stand with support of only one hand – 3”) and supine to sitting up on the edge of the table (response categories from...

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References and Readings

  1. Benaim, C., Perennou, A. D., Villy, J., Rousseaux, M., & Pelissier, J. Y. (1999). Validation of a standardized assessment of postural control in stroke patients. The postural assessment scale for stroke patients (PASS). Stroke, 30, 1862–1868.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cabanas-Valdes, R., Girabent-Farres, M., Canovas-Verge, D., Caballero-Gomez, F. M., German-Romero, A., & Bagur-Calafat, C. (2015). Spanish translation and validation of the postural assessment scale for stroke patients (PASS) to assess balance and postural control in adult post-stroke patients. Review in Neurology, 16, 151–158.Google Scholar
  3. Chien, C. W., Lin, J. H., Wang, C. H., Hsueg, I. P., Sheu, C. F., & Hsieh, C. L. (2007). Developing a short form of the postural assessment scale for people with stroke. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 21, 81–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hsueh, I.-P., Chen, K.-L., Chou, Y.-T., Wang, Y.-H., & Hsieh, C.-L. (2013). Individual-level responsiveness of the original and short-form postural assessment scale for stroke patients. Physical Therapy, 93, 1377–1382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Mao, H.-F., Hsueh, I.-P., Tang, P.-F., Sheu, C.-F., & Hsieh, C.-L. (2002). Analysis and comparison of the psychometric properties of three balance measures for stroke patients. Stroke, 33, 1022–1027.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Persson, C. U., Hansson, P.-O., Danielsson, A., & Sunnerhagen, K. S. (2011). A validation study using a modified version of postural assessment scale for stroke patients: Postural stroke study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT). Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, 8, 1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Persson, C. U., Sunnerhagen, K. S., Danielsson, A., Grimby-Ekman, A., & Hansson, P. O. (2013). Responsiveness of a modified version of the postural assessment scale for stroke patients and longitudinal change in postural control after stroke – Postural stroke study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT). Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, 10, 1–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Persson, C. U., Sunnerhagen, K. S., & Lundgren-Nilsson, A. (2014). Rasch analysis of the modified version of the postural assessment scale for stroke patients: Postural stroke study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT). BMC Neurology, 19, 1–7.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Inter-Hospital Research and Knowledge TranslationRusk RehabilitationNew YorkUSA