Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

High-Level Mobility Assessment Test

  • Gavin WilliamsEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1942

Synonyms

HiMAT

Description

The High-level Mobility Assessment Tool (HiMAT) is a unidimensional measure of mobility. It comprises ten items that are recorded by stopwatch or measure-tape. Patients are allowed a practice trial for each item. They are instructed to perform each item at their maximum safe speed, except for the stair items, where they are instructed to complete the task at “their normal speed.” Performances are then classified by performance quartiles outlined on a scorecard.

The test items are:
  1. 1

    Walking

     
  2. 2

    Walking backward

     
  3. 3

    Walking on toes

     
  4. 4

    Walking over an obstacle (house-brick)

     
  5. 5

    Running

     
  6. 6

    Skipping

     
  7. 7

    Hopping forward on the more affected leg

     
  8. 8

    Bound (onto the more affected leg)

     
  9. 9

    Bound (onto the less affected leg)

     
  10. 10

    Upstairs – dependent

     
  11. 11

    Upstairs – independent

     
  12. 12

    Downstairs – dependent

     
  13. 13

    Downstairs – independent

     

Most items are scored from 0 to 4. A score of 0 indicates the inability to perform the item, while scores of 1–4 represent...

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References and Readings

  1. Baque, E., Barber, L., Sakzewski, L., & Boyd, R. N. (2016a). Test – Re-test reproducibility of activity capacity measures for children with an acquired brain injury. Brain Injury, 30(9), 1143–1149.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baque, E., Barber, L., Sakzewski, L., & Boyd, R. N. (2016b). Reproducibility in measuring physical activity in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury. Brain Injury, 30(13–14), 1692–1698.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hill, B., Kahn, M., Pallant, J., & Williams, G. (2014). Assessment of the internal construct validity of the revised high-level mobility assessment tool for traumatic orthopaedic injuries. Clinical Rehabilitation, 28(5), 491–498.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Kissane, A. L., Eldridge, B. J., Kelly, S., Vidmar, S., Galea, M. P., & Williams, G. P. (2015). High-level mobility skills in children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 29, 1711–1716.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Kleffelgaard, I., Roe, C., Sandvik, L., Hellstrom, T., & Soberg, H. L. (2013). Measurement properties of the high-level mobility assessment tool for mild traumatic brain injury. Physical Therapy, 93(7), 900–910.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Williams, G., Robertson, V., & Greenwood, K. (2004). Measuring high-level mobility after traumatic brain injury. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 83, 910–920.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Williams, G., Robertson, V., Greenwood, K., Goldie, P., & Morris, M. E. (2005a). The high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT) for traumatic brain injury. Part 1: Item generation. Brain Injury, 19(11), 925–932.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Williams, G., Robertson, V., Greenwood, K., Goldie, P., & Morris, M. E. (2005b). The high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT) for traumatic brain injury. Part 2: Content validity and discriminability. Brain Injury, 19(10), 833–843. http://www.tbims.org/combi/PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Williams, G., Greenwood, K., Robertson, V., Goldie, P., & Morris, M. E. (2006a). High-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT): Inter-rater reliability, retest reliability and internal consistency. Physical Therapy, 86, 395–400.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Williams, G., Greenwood, K., Robertson, V., Goldie, P., & Morris, M. E. (2006b). The concurrent validity and responsiveness of the high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT) for measuring the mobility limitations of people with traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87, 437–442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Williams, G., Pallant, J., & Greenwood, K. (2010). Further development of the high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT). Brain Injury, 24(7–8), 1027–1031.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Williams, G., Hill, B., Pallant, J. F., & Greenwood, K. (2012). Internal validity of the revised HiMAT for people with neurological conditions. Clinical Rehabilitation, 26(8), 741–747.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Williams, G., Hill, B., & Kahn, M. (2014). The concurrent validity and responsiveness of the high-level mobility assessment tool for mobility limitations in people with multitrauma orthopedic injuries. PM&R, 6(3), 235–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Epworth Rehabilitation Centre Epworth HospitalRichmond MelbourneAustralia