Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Psychopharmacology

  • Maya BalamaneEmail author
  • Stephanie A. Kolakowsky-Hayner
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1698

Definition

Psychopharmacology is the study of drug-induced changes in mood, sensation, thinking, and behavior. The field of psychopharmacology studies a wide range of substances with various types of psychoactive properties. Common areas of interest are drug prescription and the appropriate use of drugs for psychiatric illness and for neuropsychiatric conditions. Some psychologists interested in psychopharmacology will focus on the behavioral effects of psychoactive or central nervous system medicine, drugs, and other chemicals of interest. Psychopharmacologists need to understand all the clinically pertinent essentials of pharmacokinetics (how the body affects medication) and pharmacodynamics (how medications affect the body). Often psychopharmacology is a combination of methods in psychology and pharmacology to study the interaction of behavior, drugs, and other environmental factors in animals and humans.

Cross-References

References and Readings

  1. Emilien, G., Penasse, C., Charles, G., Martin, D., Lasseaux, L., & Waltregny, A. (2000). Post-traumatic stress disorder: Hypotheses from clinical neuropsychology and psychopharmacology research. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, 4(1), 3–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Glannon, W. (2006). Neuroethics. Bioethics, 20(1), 37–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Müller, U., Fletcher, P., & Steinberg, H. (2006). The origin of pharmacopsychology: Emil Kraepelin’s experiments in Leipzig, Dorpat and Heidelberg (1882–1892). Psychopharmacology, 184(2), 131–138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maya Balamane
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stephanie A. Kolakowsky-Hayner
    • 2
  1. 1.Mount Sinai Brain Injury Research CenterSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA