Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Personality Inventory for Children

  • David LacharEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1584

Synonyms

BHS; PIC-2; SBS

Description

The Personality Inventory for Children, second edition (PIC-2) and related questionnaires provide objective multidimensional evaluation of children and adolescents through complementary, although independent, application of descriptions obtained from parents and teachers, as well as from the student being evaluated. The 275-item parent-completed PIC-2 and 270-item student-completed Personality Inventory for Youth (PIY) were written at a high 3rd-/low 4th-grade reading comprehension level and require a true or false response to descriptions of behavior (My child sometimes swears at me. I often disobey my parent(s).), affect (My child is usually in a good mood. I hardly ever smile.), ability (My child often has trouble finding the right words to say. It is hard for me to make good grades.), as well as family status (There is a lot of tension in our home. My parent(s) do not understand me.), and peer relations(My child often plays with a group of...

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References and Readings

  1. Fuerst, D. R., & Rourke, B. P. (1993). Psychosocial functioning of children: Relations between personality subtypes and academic achievement. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 21, 597–607.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lachar, D. (2003). Psychological assessment in child mental health settings. In I. B. Weiner (Series Ed.); J. R. Graham, & J. A. Naglieri (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of psychology, Vol. 10: Assessment psychology (Chap. 11, pp. 235–260). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  3. Lachar, D. (2004). Personality Inventory for Children, second edition (PIC-2), Personality Inventory for Youth (PIY), and the Student Behavior Survey (SBS). In M. Maruish (Ed.), The use of psychological testing for treatment planning and outcome assessment, Instruments for children and adolescents (Vol. 2, 3rd ed., pp. 141–178). Mahwah: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  4. Lachar, D., & Gdowski, C. L. (1979). Actuarial assessment of child and adolescent personality: An interpretive guide for the Personality Inventory for Children profile. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  5. Lachar, D., & Gruber, C. P. (1995). Personality Inventory for Youth (PIY) manual. Technical guide. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  6. Lachar, D., & Gruber, C. P. (2001). Personality Inventory for Children, Second Edition (PIC-2). In Standard format and Behavioral Summary manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  7. Lachar, D., & Gruber, C. P. (2009). The Behavioral Summary (BHS) manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  8. Lachar, D., Wingenfeld, S. A., Kline, R. B., & Gruber, C. P. (2000). Student Behavior Survey manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  9. Saunders, C. D., Hall, E. J., Casey, J. E., & Strang, J. D. (2000). Subtypes of psychopathology in children referred for neuropsychological assessment. Child Neuropsychology, 6, 129–143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Texas Houston Health Science CenterHoustonUSA