Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Children’s Category Test

  • Vanessa L. Ramos ScarboroughEmail author
  • Keith Owen Yeates
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1531

Synonyms

CCT

Description

The Children’s Category Test (CCT) is an abbreviated version of the original Halstead Category Test (HCT; Reitan and Wolfson 1992). The CCT is an individually administered instrument designed to measure nonverbal learning and memory, concept formation, and problem-solving abilities. The CCT consists of two levels. Level 1 is given to children aged 5–8 and consists of five subtests and 80 items. Level 2 is given to children aged 9–16 and consists of six subtests and 83 items. The child’s task is to identify the single conceptual rule underlying the items in each subtest. The last subtest on both levels requires the child to remember and reapply the conceptual rules from previous subtests.

The CCT was normed on a stratified representative sample of 920 children in 12 age groups ranging from 5 years to 16 years, 11 months. Administration requires approximately 15–20 min. The raw score is the total number of errors (CCT Total), which is converted into an age-normed...

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References and Readings

  1. Allen, D. N., Knatz, D. T., & Mayfield, J. (2006). Validity of the children’s category test-level 1 in a clinical sample of heterogeneous forms of brain dysfunction. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 21, 711–720.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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  9. Reitan, R. M., & Wolfson, D. (1992). Neuropsychological evaluation of older children. South Tucson: Neuropsychology Press.Google Scholar
  10. Reitan, R. M., & Wolfson, D. (1993). The Halstead-Reitan neuropsychological test battery: Theory and clinical interpretation (2nd ed.). South Tucson: Neuropsychology Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vanessa L. Ramos Scarborough
    • 1
    Email author
  • Keith Owen Yeates
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeuropsychologyKennedy Krieger InstituteBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada