Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Cognitive Assessment System

  • Leesa V. HuangEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1442

Synonyms

CAS2

Description

The Cognitive Assessment System – Second Edition (CAS2; Naglieri et al. 2014) is a neurocognitive instrument designed to assess children aged 5 years, 0 months to 18 years, and 11 months. The theoretical basis of the CAS2 is an extension of Alexander S. Luria’s work relating to the brain’s three functional units (Naglieri and Otero 2012). It was modified and refined by Das, Naglieri, and Kirby into four processing components: Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive Processing, otherwise known as PASS, to explain differences in cognitive processing of children (Naglieri 1999; Naglieri and Otero 2011). Each of the four PASS Composite Indexes is comprised of two core subtests and one supplementary subtest for the Extended Battery. Thus, the Core Battery utilizes 8 subtests, while the Extended Battery includes 12 subtests. Individual administration time is approximately 40 or 60 min, respectively.

The Planningsubtests require individuals to engage in a...
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References and Readings

  1. Goldstein, S., & Naglieri, J. A. (2015). Using the CAS2 in the comprehensive assessment of ADHD. The ADHD Report, 23(7), 8–10. 14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. McGill, R. J. (2015). Test review: Naglieri, J. A., Das, J. P., & Goldstein, S. (2014). Cognitive assessment system-second edition (2nd ed.) Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 33(4), 375–380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Naglieri, J. A. (1999). Essentials of CAS assessment. New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. Naglieri, J. A., & Das, J. P. (1997). Cognitive assessment system: Administration and scoring manual. Itasca, NY: Riverside Publishing.Google Scholar
  5. Naglieri, J. A. (2005). The cognitive assessment system. In D. P. Flanagan & P. L. Harrison (Eds.), Contemporary intellectual assessment: Theories, tests, and issues (2nd ed., pp. 441–460). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  6. Naglieri, J. A., & Das, J. P. (2005). Planning, attention, simultaneous, and successive (PASS) theory: A revision of the concept of intelligence. In D. P. Flanagan & P. L. Harrison (Eds.), Contemporary intellectual assessment: Theories, tests, and issues (2nd ed., pp. 120–135). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  7. Naglieri, J. A., & Otero, T. (2011). Cognitive assessment system: Redefining intelligence from a neuropsychological perspective. In A. Davis (Ed.), Handbook of pediatric neuropsychology (pp. 320–333). New York, NY: Springer.Google Scholar
  8. Naglieri, J. A., & Otero, T. M. (2012). The cognitive assessment system: From theory to practice. In D. P. Flanagan & P. L. Harrison (Eds.), Contemporary intellectual assessment: Theories, tests, and issues (3rd ed., pp. 376–399). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  9. Naglieri, J. A., & Pickering, E. (2010). Helping children learn: Intervention handouts for use in school and at home (2nd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Brooks.Google Scholar
  10. Naglieri, J. A., Das, J. P., & Goldstein, S. (2014). Cognitive assessment system–Second edition (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
  11. Power, E. M., & D’Amato, R. C. (in press). Review of the cognitive assessment system: Brief. In J. Impara & B. Plake (Eds.), Buros 20th measurements yearbook (2nd ed.). Lincoln, NE: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityChicoUSA