Silbury Hill: Environmental Archaeology

  • Gill Campbell
  • Matthew Canti
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_864-2

Introduction

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, UK (NGR SU 100 685), is the largest prehistoric mound in Western Europe. Its lies at approximately 158 m OD close to the source of the river Kennet, on the western side of the valley bottom within a natural amphitheater formed by the surrounding chalk hills. It is one of the complexes of early prehistoric monuments that comprise the UNESCO Avebury and Stonehenge World Heritage Site with Avebury Henge lying 1 km further up the valley to the north (Fig. 1), the West Kennet palisade enclosures 1 km to the east, and the West Kennet chambered long barrow occupying the first chalk ridge to the south east. Silbury Hill is a designated scheduled monument (National Heritage List for England 1008445; Scheduled Monument 21707; formerly County Number WI 2SAM 220743) and also a site of special scientific interest (SSSI) on account of the rare chalk grassland vegetation that grows on its slopes. The site is under the guardianship of the Secretary of State for...
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Historic EnglandFort CumberlandEastneyUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Manuel Arroyo-Kalin
    • 1
  • Dorian Q. Fuller
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of ArchaeologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Institute of ArchaeologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK