Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage (2003)

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1840-2

Introduction

UNESCO’s Convention for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage was adopted in October 2003 at its 31st General Conference and entered into force on 20 April 2006. With the ratification of Malta on 13 April 2017, it now has 172 States Parties representative of all regions of the world. For some States, particularly in Africa, oral and traditional culture represents a major form of cultural heritage, and intangible heritage makes a significant contribution to the social and economic development of such societies and the well-being of their populations (Blake 2001). This was an important factor in giving the impetus to strengthen international safeguarding of this heritage and to give it more prominence. Moreover, the international community has recognized the importance of intangible cultural heritage as a basis for cultural diversity (an important value given recognition in UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity of 2001) and the major role it can...

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Blake, J., ed. 2007. Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage – Challenges and approaches. Leicester: Institute of Art & Law.Google Scholar
  2. Davis, P., and M.L. Stefan, eds. 2016. Intangible cultural heritage. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Lixinski, L. 2013. Intangible heritage in international law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Smith, L., and N. Akagawa, eds. 2008. Key concepts in cultural heritage – The intangible cultural heritage. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Law and the Centres of Excellence for Education for Sustainable Development and Silk Roads StudiesShahid Beheshti UniversityTehranIran

Section editors and affiliations

  • Angela Labrador
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstAmherstUSA