Noël Hume, Ivor

  • Charles C. Kolb
Living reference work entry

Later version available View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1749-2

Basic Biographical Information

An accidental, mostly self-taught archaeologist, prolific writer and one of the founders of historical archaeology in North America, Ivor Noël Hume (known as Nöel) was born in London on November 4, 1927. He studied at Framlingham College and St. Lawrence College in England, spent a brief period in the British Army, and was an assistant stage manager at a London theater. In 1949, he began his archaeological career, joining the staff of London’s Guildhall Museum and studying under Adrian Oswald, a pioneer in clay tobacco pipe studies. In 1957, Noël Hume was hired as the first full-time trained archaeologist at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, and later became chief archaeologist and director of the expanded archaeology program at Colonial Williamsburg and subsequently the director of the Department of Archaeological Research where he remained until his retirement in 1988. He separated archaeological excavation and laboratory analyses from the Office of...

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References

  1. Noël Hume, I. 1963. Here lies Virginia; an archaeologist’s view of colonial life and history. (Reprint 1994. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia). New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  2. Noël Hume, I. 1969. Historical archaeology. (Reprint 1975. New York: Norton). New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  3. Noël Hume, I. 1970. A guide to artifacts of colonial America. (Reprint 2001. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press). New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  4. Noël Hume, I. 1974. All the best rubbish. (Reprint 2009. New York: Harper Paperbacks). New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  5. Noël Hume, I. 1982. Martin’s hundred. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  6. Noël Hume, I. 1994. Virginia adventure, Roanoke to James Towne: An archaeological and historical odyssey. (Reprint 1997. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia). New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  7. Noël Hume, I. 2001. If these pots could talk: Collecting 2000 years of British household pottery. Hanover: Chipstone Foundation/University Press of New England.Google Scholar
  8. Noël Hume, I. 2010. A passion for the past: The odyssey of a transatlantic archaeologist. Charlottesville/London: University of Virginia Press.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Klinghoffer, Eric, ed. 2013. A glorious empire: Archaeology and the Tudor-Stuart world: Essays in honor of Ivor Nöel Hume. Oxford: Oxbow Books [15 contributions].Google Scholar
  2. Noël Hume, I. 1953. Archaeology in Britain – Observing the past. London: W. & G. Foyle.Google Scholar
  3. Noël Hume, I. 1956. Treasure in the Thames. London: Frederick Muller.Google Scholar
  4. Noël Hume, I. 1957. Great moments in archaeology. London: Phoenix House.Google Scholar
  5. Noël Hume, I. 1966a. Excavations at Clay Bank in Gloucester County, Virginia, 1962–1963. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.Google Scholar
  6. Noël Hume, I. 1966b. Excavations at Tutter’s Neck in James City County, Virginia, 1960–1961. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.Google Scholar
  7. Noël Hume, I. 1966c. Excavations at Clay Bank in Gloucester County, Virginia, 1962–1963. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.Google Scholar
  8. Noël Hume, I. 1968. 1775; another part of the field. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  9. Noël Hume, I. 1969a. Glass in Colonial Williamsburg’s archaeological collections. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  10. Noël Hume, I. 1969b. Pottery and porcelain in Colonial Williamsburg’s archaeological collections. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  11. Noël Hume, I. 1969c. Archaeology and Wetherburn’s Tavern. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  12. Noël Hume, I. 1971. Archaeology. London: Gifford.Google Scholar
  13. Noël Hume, I. 1974. Digging for Carter’s Grove. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  14. Noël Hume, I. 1977. Early English delftware from London and Virginia. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  15. Noël Hume, I. 1983. Discoveries in Martin’s Hundred. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  16. Noël Hume, I. 1996. In search of this & that: Tales from an archaeologist’s quest. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  17. Noël Hume, I. 2005. Something from the cellar: More of this & that. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
  18. Noël Hume, I. 2011. Belzoni – The giant archaeologists love to hate. Charlottesville/London: University of Virginia Press.Google Scholar
  19. Noël Hume, I., and H.M. Miller. 2011. Ivor Noël Hume: Historical archaeologist. The Public Historian 33: 9–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Noël Hume, I., and A. Noël Hume. 2001. The archaeology of Martin’s hundred, part I: Interpretive studies; part II: Artifact catalog. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Preservation and AccessNational Endowment for the HumanitiesWashingtonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Patricia Fournier
    • 1
  1. 1.Posgrado en ArqueologíaEscuela Nacional de Antropología e HistoriaMéxicoMexico