Religion, Greek, Archaeology of

  • Sandra BlakelyEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1437-2

Introduction

Archaeologies of Greek religion may be divided into three categories: the analysis of artwork, the publication of sites, and the categorization of ritual practices. Topically, boundaries between these are permeable; methodologically, all of them build on the integration of material, epigraphic, and textual evidence. This relationship to textual evidence both characterizes and problematizes Greek archaeology, which is often criticized for its theoretical naïveté, its distance from anthropological archaeologies, and its striking conservatism (Dyson 1993; Morris 1994; Whitley 2001: 11–59; Barrett 2015). These characteristics are the result of a long intellectual and political history. The identification of ancient Greece as the fountainhead of western civilization served the nationalism of Greece as it emerged from Ottoman rule: it helped secure the support of European nations, and the archaeological service was one of the first departments of the new government to be...

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ClassicsEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Jeffrey A. Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Classical and Near Eastern StudiesBinghamton University - SUNYBinghamtonUSA