Cultural Heritage Management: Project Management

  • Jeffrey H. Altschul
  • Teresita Majewski
  • Richard Ciolek-Torello
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1169-2

Introduction

Cultural heritage management (CHM) projects differ significantly from traditional academic research on cultural heritage (CH) subjects. They require a management strategy that focuses on client-consultant expectations and schedules, stakeholder concerns, and adherence to laws and regulations, in addition to completing project research objectives.

Definition

The primary difference between studying cultural heritage through an academic as opposed to a CHM project is that academic research is driven by the initiator’s own topical and geographic research interests, whereas a CHM project is conducted in response to a proposed development project that triggers the project sponsor to comply with laws and regulations protecting CH resources. In addition, the former is generally funded through grants, endowments, or other funds dedicated to the advancement of research and administered through a university. The host institution is responsible for managing research endeavors and...

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Carman, J. 2015. Archaeological resource management: An international perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gerike, C. 2012. Effectively managing archaeology projects. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  3. King, T.F. 2005. Doing archaeology: A cultural resource management perspective. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  4. King, T.F., ed. 2011. A companion to cultural resource management. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  5. McManamon, F.P., A. Stout, and J.A. Barnes, eds. 2008. Managing archaeological resources: Global context, national programs, local actions, One world archaeology, 58. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  6. Stapp, D., and J. Longenecker. 2009. Avoiding archaeological disasters: A risk management approach. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey H. Altschul
    • 1
  • Teresita Majewski
    • 2
  • Richard Ciolek-Torello
    • 3
  1. 1.SRI FoundationRio RanchoUSA
  2. 2.Statistical Research, Inc.TucsonUSA
  3. 3.Statistical Research, Inc.RedlandsUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Thanik Lertcharnrit
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologySilpakorn UniversityBangkokThailand