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Polygonatum glaberrimum C. Koch. Polygonatum orientale Desf. Asparagaceae

  • George Fayvush
  • Alla Aleksanyan
  • Ketevan Batsatsashvili
  • Zaal Kikvidze
  • Manana Khutsishvili
  • Inesa Maisaia
  • Shalva Sikharulidze
  • David Tchelidze
  • Narel Y. Paniagua Zambrana
  • Rainer W. BussmannEmail author
Living reference work entry
  • 43 Downloads
Part of the European Ethnobotany book series (EUROETH)

Synonyms

Convallaria orientalis (Desf.) Poir.; Convallaria polyanthema M. Bieb.; Polygonatum polyanthemum (M. Bieb.) Link

Local Names

Armenia: Open image in new windowOpen image in new window (Sindrik arevelyan); Georgia: Open image in new window – svintrai; English: Solomon’s seal.

Botany and Ecology

Erect herb with angled and hairless stems 15–65 cm tall. Leaves alternate, broadly ovate to elliptic usually lacking petioles. Leaves notably variable in shape, hairless above and minutely hairy on veins of underside. One to three flowers per stalk. Flowers narrow in the middle and with pubescent teeth at tips. Berries blue-black, 5–10 mm long. Found mainly in oak scrub and Pine and Fagus forests 500–1900 m. Grows in Crimea, Caucasia, and Northwestern Iran. Polygonatum orientale grows in shaded rocky slopes especially Pine and Fagusforests between 500 and 1900 m. Transcaucasia and North Caucasus, East Mediterranean, South-West Asia. In Armenia in Shirak, Lori, Idjevan, Aparan, Sevan,...

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Fayvush
    • 1
  • Alla Aleksanyan
    • 1
  • Ketevan Batsatsashvili
    • 2
  • Zaal Kikvidze
    • 3
  • Manana Khutsishvili
    • 2
  • Inesa Maisaia
    • 2
  • Shalva Sikharulidze
    • 2
  • David Tchelidze
    • 2
  • Narel Y. Paniagua Zambrana
    • 4
  • Rainer W. Bussmann
    • 5
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Botany of National Academy of SciencesYerevanArmenia
  2. 2.Institute of Botany and Bakuriani Alpine Botanical GardenIlia State UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  3. 3.4-D Research InstituteIlia State UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  4. 4.Herbario Nacional de BoliviaInstituto de Ecología-UMSALa PazBolivia
  5. 5.William L. Brown CenterMissouri Botanical GardenSt. LouisUSA

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