Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Research as Daily Practice

  • Sally St. GeorgeEmail author
  • Dan Wulff
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_890

Name of Theory

Research As Daily Practice

Synonyms

Everyday practice; Practice-based research; Reflection in practice

Introduction

Research As Daily Practice is a term used to describe an innovative and efficient way of appreciating the contributions of practitioners to the development of new knowledge while simultaneously facilitating effective practice. We see the activities of daily or everyday practice* as research, casting practitioners in the role of researchers. This is different from applying research results into practice – it is about acknowledging that the actions practitioners undertake when they “do” practice can be understood as research itself.

Prominent Associated Figures

Sally St. George, Dan Wulff, Karl Tomm.

Description

Through Research As Daily Practice, we trouble the customary distinction between research and practice by not making a distinction between research and practice. Recent professional discourse in many helping professions has been focused on creating...

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References

  1. Frank, A. W. (2010). Letting stories breathe: A socio-narratology. London: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. St. George, S., Wulff, D., & Strong, T. (2014). Researching interpersonal patterns. In K. Tomm, S. St. George, D. Wulff, & T. Strong (Eds.), Patterns in interpersonal interactions: Inviting relational understandings for therapeutic change (pp. 210–228). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. St. George, S., Wulff, D., & Tomm, K. (2015a). Research as daily practice: Introduction to the special section. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 34(2), 1–2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. St. George, S., Wulff, D., & Tomm, K. (2015b). Research as daily practice. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 34(2), 3–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. St. George, S., Wulff, D., & Tomm, K. (2015c). Talking societal discourse into family therapy: A situational analysis of the relationships between societal expectations and parent-child conflict. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 34(2), 15–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Wulff, D., & St. George, S. (2014). Research as daily practice. In G. Simon & A. Chard (Eds.), Systemic inquiry: Innovations in reflexive practice research (pp. 292–308). London: Everything is Connected Press.Google Scholar
  7. Wulff, D., St. George, S., Tomm, K., Doyle, E., & Sesma, M. (2015a). Unpacking the PIPs to HIPs curiosity: A narrative study. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 34(2), 45–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Wulff, D., St. George, S., & Tomm, K. (2015b). Societal discourses that help in family therapy: A modified situational analysis of the relationships between societal expectation and healing patterns in parent-child conflict. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 34(2), 31–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Margarita Tarragona
    • 1
  1. 1.PositivaMente & Grupo Campos ElíseosMexico CityMexico