Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Multidimensional Ecosystemic Comparative Approach (MECA)

  • Celia Jaes FalicovEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_848

Introduction

As practitioners are called to provide care to a wider and more culturally diverse range of clients, there is also increasing recognition that the encounter between practitioners and clients is a cultural and sociopolitical encounter. MECA, the Multidimensional Ecological Comparative Approach is a systems oriented postmodern framework designed to provide a culturally attuned and socially empowering approach in family therapy theory, research, clinical practice, and training (Falicov 1995, 2014a, b, 2016a). MECA can be used to work with clients from many different cultures around the world. MECA was first developed in 1995 by Celia Jaes Falicov, who had pioneered introducing cultural perspectives in family therapy theory, practice, and training from an ecosystemic viewpoint (Falicov 1983, 1988).

MECA is based on the belief that we are all multicultural persons rather than belonging to a single group subsumed under a single label: Latino, lesbian, Lutheran, or Black. MECA...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mudita Rastogi
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Argosy UniversitySchaumburgUSA