Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Collaborative and Dialogic Therapy with Couples and Families

  • Sue LevinEmail author
  • Adriana Gil-Wilkerson
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_828

Synonyms

CLS (collaborative language systems); Collaborative; Collaborative practices; Conversational therapy; Dialogical; Not knowing; Problem-determined system; Postmodern approaches; Relational therapy; Social constructionist theories

Therapy Strategies and Interventions

Name of the Strategy or Intervention

Collaborative and dialogic therapy does not use particular strategies or interventions; rather, it demonstrates a philosophical stance in the way that therapeutic conversations and dialogues are conducted (Anderson 1997, 2000, 2001). The therapist, or other helper, using this approach, engages clients from a non-knowing stance or position of a curious and respectful learner; the client(s) is the expert on their own concerns, struggles, goals, and preferred outcomes.

Introduction

Collaborative and dialogic therapy is used at the Houston Galveston Institute (HGI), a counseling and training center currently located in Houston, TX. The institute was founded in Galveston, Texas, by...

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References

  1. Andersen, T. (1991). The reflecting team: Dialogues and dialogues about the dialogues. New York: WW Norton & Co.Google Scholar
  2. Andersen, T. (1992). Relationship, language and pre-understanding in the reflecting processes. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 13(2), 87–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Anderson, H. (1997). Conversation, language and possibilities: A postmodern approach to therapy. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  4. Anderson, H. (2000). Becoming a postmodern collaborative therapist: A clinical and theoretical journey, part I. Journal of the Texas Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, 3(1), 5–12.Google Scholar
  5. Anderson, H. (2001). Becoming a postmodern collaborative therapist: A clinical and theoretical journey, part II. Journal of the Texas Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, 6(1), 4–22.Google Scholar
  6. Anderson, H. (2007). A postmodern umbrella: Language and knowledge as relational and generative, and inherently transforming. In H. Anderson & D. Gehart (Eds.), Collaborative therapy: Relationships and conversations that make a difference (pp. 7–19). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Anderson, H., & Jensen, P. (Eds.). (2007). Innovations in the reflecting process: The influence of Tom Andersen. London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  8. Anderson, H., Goolishian, H., Pulliam, G., & Winderman, L. (1986). The Galveston family institute: A personal and historical perspective. In D. Efron (Ed.), Journeys: Expansions of the strategic systemic therapies (pp. 97–122). New York: Bruner/Mazel.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adjunct FacultyOur Lady of the Lake UniversityHoustonUSA
  2. 2.The Taos InstituteChagrin FallsUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Margarita Tarragona
    • 1
  1. 1.PositivaMente & Grupo Campos ElíseosMexico CityMexico