Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Christensen, Andrew

  • Katherine J. W. BaucomEmail author
  • Brian R. W. Baucom
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_676

Introduction

Andrew Christensen’s contributions to couple and family therapy are numerous. He is best known for his research on the demand/withdraw interaction pattern as well as the development, evaluation, and dissemination of Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy.

Career

Andrew Christensen, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology at University of California, Los Angeles. Christensen obtained his A.A. from Grand View College in Des Moines, Iowa, and his B.A. in Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. After he received his bachelor’s degree, Christensen worked for several years, first as a social worker and then as a psychology instructor at community colleges in Iowa. Following these professional positions, as well as a year traveling in the United States and abroad, Christensen enrolled in the University of Oregon, where he obtained his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1976. Christensen’s first faculty position...

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References

  1. Christensen, A., & Heavy, C. L. (1990). Gender and social structure in the demand-withdraw pattern of marital conflict. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59, 73–81.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Christensen, A., Atkins, D. C., Baucom, B. R., & Yi, J. (2010). Marital status and satisfaction five years following a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78, 225–235.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Christensen, A., Doss, B. D., & Jacobson, N. S. (2014). Reconcilable differences: Rebuild your relationship by rediscovering the partner you love – Without losing yourself (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  4. Christensen, A., Dimidjan, S., & Martell, C. R. (2015). Integrative behavioral couple therapy. In A. S. Gurman, J. L. Lebow, & D. K. Snyder (Eds.), Clinical handbook of couple therapy (5th ed., pp. 61–96). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  5. Jacobson, N. S., & Christensen, A. (1998). Acceptance and change in couple therapy: A therapist’s guide to transforming relationships. New York: Norton.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine J. W. Baucom
    • 1
    Email author
  • Brian R. W. Baucom
    • 2
  1. 1.University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Brian Baucom
    • 1
  1. 1.University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA