Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Milan Associates

  • Allen SabeyEmail author
  • Jake Jensen
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_601

Synonyms

Milan group; Milan team

Introduction

From the late 1960s to the late 1970s, the Milan Associates were housed at the Institute for the Study of the Family in Milan, Italy, and consisted of four individuals: Mara Selvini Palazzoli, the founder of the Institute, Gianfranco Cecchin, Luigi Boscolo, and Giuliana Prata. Greatly influenced by Gregory Bateson and others’ work on systemic communication, they shifted from their psychoanalytic backgrounds to a strategic and systemic approach to treating families with major mental disorders (e.g., schizophrenia). They became one of the most influential training teams in the world, and their advancements in the field led to the development of the Milan Systemic Family Therapy approach. The group amicably disbanded in the late 1970s due to disagreements in theory and practice; many approaches have evolved from their original ideas.

Location

Milan, Italy

Prominent Associated Figures

Mara Selvini Palazzoli

Gianfranco Cecchin

Luigi Boscolo

Giuli...

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References

  1. Bateson, G. (1972). Steps to an ecology of mind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. Boscolo, L., Cecchin, G., Hoffman, L., & Penn, P. (1987). Milan systemic family therapy: Conversations in theory and practice. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  3. Palazzoli, M. S., Boscolo, L., Cecchin, G., & Prata, G. (1974). The treatment of children through brief therapy of their parents. Family Process, 13, 429–442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.East Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Thorana Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah State UniversitySanta FeUSA