Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Reclamation

  • P. P. Wong
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_254-2

Although normally associated with the rehabilitation of land, reclamation in the coastal context refers to the exclusion of marine or estuarine water from formerly submerged land. The basic idea of reclamation is to win land from the sea, to displace water and to create new land (Plant et al. 1998, p. 563). The resulting land surface normally extends from the existing coastline and should be well above the level reached by the sea. Reclamation differs from the building up of shallow offshore grounds to form artificial islands (q.v) (Kondo 1995). It also differs from polders (q.v.) (CUR 1993, p. 230, 244) in which the level of land subject to seasonal or permanent high water level is protected by dikes, and flood control and water management are important aspects.

Historical and Geographical Brief

The origins of reclamation probably date back to humankind’s efforts in reclaiming land from estuaries and along coasts for their homes, livestock, and crops. For example, in the first few...
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore