Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Offshore Sand Banks and Linear Sand Ridges

  • Randolph A. McBride
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_235-2
Shelf sand banks and linear sand ridges are found on numerous modern and ancient continental shelves where sufficient sand exists and currents are strong enough to transport sand-sized sediment (Off 1963; Snedden and Dalrymple 1999; Dyer and Huntley 1999). Sand banks and linear sand ridges are defined as all elongate coastal to shelf sand bodies that form bathymetric highs on the seafloor and are characterized by a closed bathymetric contour (Fig. 1). Other terms used to refer to these specific bathymetric features include linear shoals, shoreface ridges, shoreface-attached or detached ridges, shoreface-connected or disconnected ridges, tidal current ridges, and banner banks.
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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geography and Earth ScienceGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA