Encyclopedia of Animal Cognition and Behavior

Living Edition
| Editors: Jennifer Vonk, Todd Shackelford

Platyrrhine Cognition

  • Valentina Truppa
  • Gloria Sabbatini
  • Eugenia Polizzi di Sorrentino
Living reference work entry

Later version available View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47829-6_1858-1

Synonyms

Definition

Platyrrhine cognition (from Latin cognitio which means “knowledge”) can be defined as the set of mental functions by means of which New World monkeys acquire and use information – knowledge – to solve the problems they face in their environment.

Introduction

Platyrrhines, or New World monkeys (NWM), started their independent evolution from catarrhines, or Old World monkeys (OWM), about 30–40 million years ago, when they arrived to the then island continent of South America. Living species include nonhuman primates from South and Central America. They are a very diverse group of small to medium-size...
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valentina Truppa
    • 1
  • Gloria Sabbatini
    • 1
  • Eugenia Polizzi di Sorrentino
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Cognitive Sciences and TechnologiesNational Research CouncilRomeItaly

Section editors and affiliations

  • Valerie Dufour
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Ecology, Physiology and EthologyUniversity of StrasbourgStrasbourgFrance