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Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002)

  • Federica Turriziani ColonnaEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Stephen Jay Gould contributed to paleontology, evolutionary biology, developmental biology, and the history of science during the second half of the twentieth century. He was also one of the most influential writers of popular science of his generation. Gould’s scientific work impacted the evolutionary theory from a philosophical perspective and historically contributed to the establishment of evo-devo.

This chapter discusses Stephen J. Gould’s legacy as it relates to evo-devo. In particular, the chapter analyzes the concepts of punctuated equilibria, heterocrony, and neoteny as discussed in Gould’s 1977 Ontogeny and Phylogeny, as well as the concepts of developmental constraints and exaptation. Finally, this chapter describes Gould’s contribution to macroevolution and his proposal of the concept of levels of selection.

Keywords

Neoteny Developmental constraints Exaptation Macroevolution 

References

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Gould’s Selected Bibliography

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  3. Gould SJ (1989) Wonderful life: the burgess shale and the nature of history. W.W. Norton & Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Gould SJ (1992a) Ever since Darwin: reflections on natural history. W.W. Norton & Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Gould SJ (1992b) The panda’s thumb: more reflections on natural history. W.W. Norton & Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  6. Gould SJ (1996) The mismeasure of man. W.W. Norton & Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  7. Gould SJ (2002) The structure of evolutionary theory. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  8. Gould SJ, Eldredge N (1972) Punctuated equilibria: an alternative to phyletic gradualism. In: Schopf TJM (ed) Models in paleobiology. Freeman, Cooper, and Co, San Francisco, pp 82–115Google Scholar
  9. Gould SJ, Eldredge N (1977) Punctuated equilibria: the tempo and mode of evolution reconsidered. Paleobiology 3:115–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  11. Gould SJ, Vrba E (1982) Exaptation – a missing term in the science of form. Paleobiology 8:4–15CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Biology and SocietyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Daniel Nicholson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology, Philosophy and AnthropologyUniversity of ExeterExeterUK

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